Beginner's Guide to a Pro Kit: Foundation + The Basics

 Ava V. Photography

Ava V. Photography

If you read my last post about becoming a makeup artist, you know the next move is building your kit. Like I mentioned in the previous post, your kit is going to be expensive and you'll constantly be finding new products to add and take out. And I know it's difficult if you're just starting out, but you really need to keep your professional kit separate from the makeup you use on yourself. I have all the fancy schmancy good products in my kit, so - although rare - sometimes I'll want to bust those out on myself for a special occasion, but generally I keep my personal stash and my kit completely separate.
 
If you have the credentials, you can get pro discounts at professional makeup supply stores such as Camera Ready Cosmetics and Frends Beauty. These online shops are targeted to makeup artists, carrying lines you won't find at Ulta or Walgreens (although, they do carry consumer lines as well). Ben Nye, RCMA, Face Atelier, Graftobian, Cinema Secrets, Kett, Kryolan, and Mehron are just a few examples of pro lines that are good to have in your kit. Pro products are generally more pigmented with less filler ingredients, designed to last long hours, and look undetectable on camera. 
 
I would say the first thing you need to invest in is a foundation palette. As I said in my last post, get a foundation palette so "you're not turning down work because you can't color match someone, and you're not relying on the client to have their correct shade and a decent foundation to use."

                                RCMA Shinto VK Palette

                               RCMA Shinto VK Palette

Camera Ready Cosmetics actually offers sample size versions of foundations, so you can order some and test out a few different formulas to see which one you like best. I keep Face Atelier (various shades), RCMA (Shinto Palette), and Graftobian (Warm Palette) in my kit. The RCMA palette is the one you'll find most MUAs recommend for a newbie. Fair warning: it has a learning curve, but once you figure it out, the result is beautiful. It's very skin-like. Take a look at this clean makeup I did on model Veda:

Face Atelier Ultra Foundation is a good liquid version if that's what you're more comfortable with. It's pricey but you can get the sample sizes for $1 on the FA website, which can last for maybe three clients or so. They also sell samples of it at CRC but it's a little more expensive. Here's what it looks like straight from my phone camera and professionally edited:

RCMA, Face Atelier, and Graftobian are all beautiful on and off camera, but there's even more options out there besides the brands I keep in my kit, so do some testing and find which ones work best for you.
 
Some other basic items you'll need...
 
- A metal palette and spatula. Use the spatula to scoop out your cream/liquid products onto your palette. If your spatula touches skin or anything unsanitized, do not dip it back into product until you've cleaned it. 
- Disposable mascara wands (you can cut off the wand of the mascara you use in your kit so that you don't absent-mindedly use it on a client). These also work great for brushing eyebrows.
- QTips (the ones with the pointed ends work great for cleaning up winged liner)
- Cotton Rounds (for skincare prep)
- Spray Bottles: One for 70% alcohol and one for water (just in case there's not a sink for you to use should you need it)
- A color wheel is nice to keep in your kit to reference if you need it
 
I hope this helps get you started on your journey! Feel free to comment below with any thoughts or questions, and make sure you follow me on Instagram and Facebook for daily posts!